Nov 12 2011

Burlington Free Press Sets the Stage for Comment Moderation

joanne

Finally. In a blog post a few days ago, David Farr, the “Online Director” (love that title) at the Burlington Free Press, proclaimed that the .com version would no longer accept comments from anonymous readers. While some are claiming violation of free speech, I say good riddance.

If you care to comment, identify yourself

In an earlier, related post at Joanne Taylor PR, I said that those who remain anonymous do so because they lack the courage to show themselves or identify who they really are. They complain about the world’s ills, about the way people are doing their jobs, about government injustice. They make false accusations, and speak hurtful untruths. Yet, they have no solutions or meaningful suggestions.

News editors have for too long given faceless people a platform. I hope Burlington Free Press’ move to moderate comments is the start of what’s to come from other news outlets.


Jan 26 2011

Joanne Taylor of Boise Shares Glimpses of Vegas, Behind-the-Scenes Photos

joanne

Before moving to Boise and eventually starting Joanne Taylor PR, I worked in Vegas (and Reno) promoting big-name entertainment, special events, world-class restaurants, and, of course, gaming. I recently came across some old photos from those years and wanted to share a few of them. I posted more on my Facebook page, including a few from my dad’s stash.  Click here, if you’d like to take a look.

It’s funny how callous you become to the whole Vegas thing when being part of it is your job–like the night I stood ringside, at the ropes, next to a Sports Illustrated photographer during the much-anticipated Chavez vs. De La Hoya fight. Great night, and a fierce  fight, but it was mostly work, and I thought of it as such. The three weeks prep time beforehand wiped me out and at 11 p.m., when VIPs and stars broke into full party mode, I went home.

I never asked anyone to take my photo at events or with stars because I was too busy stressing out about everything coming off right. But sometimes, it just happened. Someone would walk up and snap a photo and give it to me later or, in Wayne Gretzky’s case, “their people” would send it to me in the mail (The Gretzky picture was taken after a news conference I organized for the Kings and Rangers at the Hilton). I never asked for autographs, either. My dad taught me not to ask for them. “They’re just people,” he’d say, “most of them with more problems than the rest of us. And, besides, they’re working. Don’t bother them.”

Once, not that long ago, my dad was conducting for Tony Bennett. He asked me if I wanted to tag along, as he often did when I lived there or was in town for a visit. We talked to Tony backstage before the curtain for about 10 minutes. He and my dad were the same age and had become friends over the years they played together. They were reminiscing about the “old days,” laughing, and even talking about their ailments–like older people do. I didn’t think of this as a big deal but I did enjoy the moment. Not because I was talking to a star, but because I was in on this bit of their history, and shared love for music and life. I didn’t need a photo or an autograph; the scene is indelibly etched in my mind.

Anyway, I hope you enjoy these few bits and pieces of a time long gone by, and oftentimes missed…

Joanne Taylor of Boise and Jonathan Frakes

This photo was taken of me and Jonathan Frakes at the "after party" of one of the largest and most elaborate events I've seen. It was the groundbreaking for "Star Trek The Experience" at the Las Vegas Hilton. We worked with Paramount to plan and pull it off. The event and party budget was $1 million!

The champ after a training workout in Reno. Foreman is a great guy. Always smiling. Always time for the fans. I ended up sitting at the ring on a milk crate, next to his doctor, during this fight (Foreman vs. Ellis, 1991)